Friday Musings 1/26/2018

Anyone notice how fast the days are going? January is almost through and it feels we just got to the new year. 

Writing makes life go faster, too. I try to slow down and think of new things to learn, new posts to ask fellow writers to conjure thought and new ideas. 

Then it popped into my head. How character's are created and made real. 

This idea sparked from a post I read about Jack Ketchum (Rest in Peace), where he says something in the manner of trying to leave the world a little better for you having written in it. 

Those posts sparked in my, who really is to tell  you how to write a scene, or character? You give them attributes that you feel reflect real life, from things that have happened to you in life. If it rings true, it rings true, but you don't have to do it like others. 

You are you. 

Things that have happened to you, or interactions you've witnessed around you, shape what your writing will be. Of course you need some skills to sew these pieces all together, but as long as you have some basic knowledge, and can convey what you want, it should be enough to get the point across. 

Look at Neil Gaiman. For me, I have to read a few pages of him before getting into his style. For others it may be easier. But afterwards, I see what he had been trying to construct. If you're good at it, it leaves an impression in the reader--but that's another subject. 

You can focus on something that makes the scene real for you, it will resonate with someone. Of course there are tricks for making things stand out and implanting certain thoughts and feelings into the reader, but if you want to stand out, you have to break away from that somewhat. 

Above all, the character must ring true. 

It's not easy, and as you go you'll get better at feeling if something doesn't seem right. Some ignore instinct, or critique, but the smart ones take all these points their given into account. 

Everyone has a different way of writing, Who's to say what's right or what's  wrong? As long as the reader gets what you're trying to do. Of course other rules apply when writing a scene, don't get me wrong, this isn't a fast and quick theory into writing realistically. Just don't let anyone tell you that it's not right because it's not like theirs. 

How do you write characters? Where do you gain experience to create them? Are they different personalities within you, or do you base them off of real people? Do you read psychology to get a better understanding on how the mind works? 

I'd love to know. Leave your answers in the comments section below, or on Twitter @Wcmarchese. 

Enjoy your weekend. 

WCM

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